Comment

What is Functional Training?

As humans, we are challenged to perform certain functions of everyday life and few people would argue this fact. I’m going to outline a few of these functions and how we train to be able to perform these functions more optimally, reduce the risk of injury while performing these functions, and how functional training for human performance mimics functional training for athletic performance.

  1. Force production: walking, running, jumping, swimming, dancing, and even picking up our kids all require our muscles to produce a certain level of “force," ranging from minimal (walking) to much higher (sprinting) to repetitive (picking up a toddler over and over just to have them to tell you to put them down 2 seconds later). By developing strength through different ranges of motion, using different implements and different loads, we improve our ability to produce force more efficiently, more quickly, and with less need for recovery. This improvement in force production capability leads to not getting as tired walking up 15 flights of stairs, feeling less “winded” after chasing down the 10 page briefing that blew away while walking to the office, and less pain from bending down and picking up the indecisive three year old. 
  2. Force reduction: the ability to quickly stop our momentum while walking, running, landing after jumping or stop another object or person’s momentum is a quality that is difficult to quantify in daily life. Fortunately, force reduction is fairly simple to train. Whether the cause is an absent-minded adolescent with their nose buried in their iPhone or the seemingly imminent car accident we see coming from a block away, our brains and bodies have a unique way of protecting us from these potentially life-threatening situations. The main challenge in reducing force is that even though our brain stimulates our muscles to “brace”, many times our muscles are not strong enough to withstand whatever external forces are impacting us. The way we train for force reduction is by causing our brain to react faster, and then by strengthening the muscles that protect our spine. 
  3. Carrying objects: maybe the most consistent function outside of walking is carrying things. Since pre-historic times, humans have tried to carry things in the most efficient and sustainable ways. Some of those strategies have proven effective, others not so much, yet even with the technological advances of the last few centuries, we still find ourselves trying to come up with innovative ways of carrying things. The function of carrying is a combination of the two previous qualities: force production and reduction concurrently. Carrying groceries into the house is a great example: I always try to carry as many bags as possible to minimize trips (efficiency). Picking up and holding onto the grocery bags requires us to produce force while resisting the back and forth sway of the bags and staying upright requires us to reduce the force the bags are exerting on us. 

Functional training for athletes may require more force at different speeds, loads etc, but ultimately the demands remain the same: force production and reduction. Functional training for human performance makes everything we do as humans easier, more efficient, and ultimately healthier for longer. 

Comment

Comment

How to Train Around Lower Back Pain

Search Google for lower back pain and you will return almost 8 million hits, with a slightly narrower list of potential causes. Trying to find a sustainable solution to chronic, non-specific lower back pain is like trying to figure out what caused your lower back pain to begin with.

My default strategy of training around (not treating) lower back pain is always movement and activation first. Based on the results of a handful of assessments to determine core strength, hip mobility, and spinal stability, I will implement a few of the following strategies:

  1. Glute Max/Med Activation: the better our glutes function, the less pressure you feel in your lower back. Our glutes drive the majority of our forward movement and spend most of the day turned off because we sit so much. More often than not, just adding glute bridges will alleviate some low-level back pain. 
  2. Hip External Rotation: using a mini-band or combination of mini-bands to activate the deep, intrinsic hip muscles that turn our hips out when our knees are bent is a powerful way to teach our hips to rotate safely and combined with glute activation, our hips learn how to be less dependent on our hip flexors to move forward.
  3. Lumbar Spine Stabilization: putting ourselves in unstable positions causes our brains to react by protecting our spinal cord. Doing so in a safe training environment is an effective way to trick our brains into strengthening the stabilizing muscles of our spines. 

If you or someone you know is affected by non-specific, chronic and low-level lower back pain, send me an email; I would love to help in any way I can.

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 04.26.17

I've been fighting a groin/hip issue all week so I've been trying to recover from that. I'm still not 100% but I wanted to get some work in today so I focused on some high volume pulling, high quality pressing, lots of trunk stability, and lots of lumbo-pelvic integration.

Movement Prep

Serratus Wall Slides w/ foam roller

2x10

Quadraped T-Spine Rotations 

2x8 ea

Quadraped Scap Pushups

2x8

Strength Work

TRX Rows

3x20

Mountain Climber Iso w/ Bosu

3x5@5s ea

Half-Kneeling SA KB Press 

3x5 ea @16kg

Mobility/Stability

1A.) Assisted Leg Lowers

2x10 ea

1B.) Plank to Pushup

2x8

2A.) TRX Ham Curl+Bridge

2x8

2B.) PB Deadbugs

2x6 ea

3A.) TRX OH Squat

2x5@3311

3B.) Quadraped Rockers

2x10

4A.) Toes Elevated Toe Touch w/ Adduction (foam roller b/t knees; toes elevated 2")

2x30s 

4B.) Iso Bridge w/ Adduction (foam roller b/t knees)

2x30s

 

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 04.23.17

Today's session was a modified version of last Sunday's training. My shoulders were a little sore from all the overhead work last week and I noticed a negative pull-push ratio so I replaced presses with strict pull-ups. I was also pressed for time so I shortened my movement prep a bit.

Movement Prep

Mini Band Series (lateral/monster walk) x20 ea

Quadraped T-Spine Rotations x8 ea

Cat-Cow x8

Scap Push-ups x8

WOD

Perform all 10 rounds of A block, followed immediately by B block, followed immediately by C block with minimal rest between blocks.

A.)KB Swings (24kg)

30 seconds on/30 seconds off

10 rounds

B.) Double KB Deadlift (24kg)

1x20

C.) Strict Pull-ups

5x5 ea

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 04.21.17

 I took today to work on some things I've neglected for quite a while: shoulder mobility, scapular stability, and breathing. I noticed a lack of stability overhead yesterday during my carries and presses so I felt like it would be a good time to start addressing that issue. I've also been noticing a lack of synchronicity in my breathing this week and thus am going to try and dial that in and try to turn down some of the elevated sympathetic nervous system tone I've been feeling. 

Mobility/Pre-Hab

Serratus Wall Slides w/ Foam Roller

2x10

Power Pigeons 2x5 ea @10-15s

Squat to Stands 2x10

Recovery/Regeneration

Floor Angels on Foam Roller (full inhales on depression/retraction, full exhales on elevation/protraction)

2x10

90/90 Breathing (3/5/1 pattern; 3s inhale, hold, 5s exhale, 1s pause)

1x20

 

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 04.20.17 (4/20 Edition)

Today's session was a challenge, but if I've learned anything in this first week, it's that I'm really feeling my recovery well. Between blocks or rounds or individual movements, I've been able to gauge how quickly or slowly I'm recovering. I really liked starting with get-ups yesterday so I started today with 1/2 get-ups in the same format.

Movement Prep

Mini Band Series (lateral/monster walk) x20 ea

Bear Crawl Series (fwd/rev/lateral) x10 ea

Triangle T-spine Rotations w/ unilateral Rocker x8 ea

Cat-Cow x8

Scap Pushups x8

Hip Flow x3 

WOD

A.) 1/2 TGUs

5 ea @16kg

3 ea @20kg

1 ea @24kg

2A.) RFESS 3x6 ea (20kg)

1st set: Goblet 

2nd set: Offset front rack (kb over forward leg)

3rd set: Offset hanging (kb beside forward leg)

2B.) Carries 3x 50m (24kg x2) 

1st set: farmer walk

2nd set: 1 farmer, 1 front rack (switch at 25m)

3rd set: hi/low 1 farmer, 1 overhead (switch at 25m)

3A.) Double KB Complex: 3 ea @20kg

Double Swings

Double Cleans

Double Front Squat

Seesaw Press (unilateral press from front rack)

5 rounds

Recovery

Lower body SMR x60s ea

TRX Overhead Squat x5

TRX Split Stance T-Spine Rotations x10s/10 reps ea

 

 

 

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 04.19.17

I felt some dysfunction in my hips after the first two training sessions this week so I decided to focus on doing some intentional movement quality work today; kind of a neural reset button and an attempt to get back to neutral. The ascending load/descending repetition protocol I used for my TGUs proved to be a really effective buildup to the tri-set that followed. The tri-set proved to be just intense enough to spike my heart rate not intense enough to inhibit almost full recovery with the 30-40s of rest each round.

Movement Prep

Mini Band Series (lateral/monster walk) x20 ea

Bear Crawl Series (fwd/rev/lat) x10 ea

Quadraped T-Spine Rotations x8 ea

Quadraped Cat-Cow x8

Quadraped Scap Pushups x8

Hip Flow x3 

WOD

A.) TGUs

5 ea (16kg)

3 ea (20kg)

1 ea (24kg)

B.) 8 Min EMOM 

With a 20 kg KB every 2 minutes perform:

5 Tempo Goblet Squats @3311

5 Snatches each side

30s Kneeling Plank

Recovery/Regen

Lower Body SMR x60s ea

T-Spine Extensions on the foam roller x8

 

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 04.18.17

Recovery Day

SMR with a lower body focus: I tried to spend a minute or two on the following areas: glute med/max, hamstrings, IT bands, quads (rectus femoris), VMO at a 45 degree angle, hip flexors, and adductors. I followed that series up with some side-lying t-spine rotations with the foam roller on my serratus/teres minor. I've noticed a ~10 degree difference in thoracic rotation from right to left recently so I wanted to start balancing that out. (10 minutes total)

Mobility with a hip flexion/extension and external rotation emphasis: I spent around 2 minutes bilaterally breathing in and out of a Brettzel, trying to relaxing into thoracic extension/rotation with each exhalation. (5 minutes total)

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 04.17.17

Happy Patriots' Day Everyone! 

Today's session was a bit of a work capacity grinder so it took a little longer than I wanted it to take. Hopefully, in the next 4 weeks I can cut down on that time. I was pretty sore from yesterday's swings so I took a little extra SMR time before movement prep to work some of the soreness out of my glutes and hamstrings.

Movement Prep

Glute/Ham SMR x30s ea

Mini Band Series (lateral/monster walk) x20 ea

Squat to Stand x10

Bear Crawl (fwd/rev) x15 ea

Cat-Cow x8

Tall-Kneeling Good Mornings x15

WOD

A.) Double KB Clean+Front Squat (20kg)

1-2-3-4-5-4-3-2-1

2A.) KB Goblet Clock Lunges (24kg)

3x5 ea (fwd/lat/rev/rev/lat/fwd; right then left)

2B.) 3 Pt KB Row (24kg)

3x10 ea

3A.) KB Floor Press (24kg)

2x10 ea

3B.) KB Windmill (16kg)

2x8 ea

Recovery

Lower Body SMR

Adductor/Quad/ITB/Glute Med/Glute Max/Ham x30s ea (R/L)

 

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 04.16.17

Movement Prep

Mini Band Series (lateral walk/monster walk) x20 ea

Band Pull-Aparts x20

Serratus Wall Slides x20

Triangle T-Spine Rotations x10 ea

WOD

Perform all 10 rounds of A block, followed immediately by B block, followed immediately by C block with minimal rest between blocks.

A.)KB Swings (24kg)

30 seconds on/30 seconds off

10 rounds

B.) Double KB Deadlift (24kg)

1x20

C.) Half-Kneeling KB Press (12kg)

5x5 ea

Recovery

Foam roll adductor, quad, IT band, glute (right leg then left leg)

Total time: 22 minutes

Comment

Comment

The Single Implement Method

My training for the last several months has been very haphazard and inconsistent with no real goal, program, or strategy. In an effort to make my training more consistent, I'm going to pick one implement and use it exclusively for 4 weeks for 4-5 days per week. My training sessions will be no longer than 30 minutes including movement prep and recovery. On my recovery days, I will focus on 2-3 problem areas and spend no more than 15 minutes on regeneration, mobility, and breathing work. I feel like I've wasted too much time either a) not training at all b) directionless or c) training myself into the ground. I'm going to the single implement method to alleviate all of these and given its versatility, the first implement I will using will be a kettlebell.  I will be posting Valhalla WODs much more consistently and hopefully some of you will follow along or at least take away something of value. Happy training!

Comment

Comment

The Socratic Method of Coaching

The Socratic Method has been a mainstay in classrooms for a long time now, however it really hasn’t made its way onto the courts, playing fields and weight rooms in the same way.  Coaches frequently call themselves “teachers” but rarely evaluate the methodology with which they teach; usually regurgitating strategies or cues that were used by their coaches, with little effectiveness.  

 

The best coaches compel intrigue and draw curiosity out of their athletes using pointed questions that force them to create a kinesthetic and neuromuscular feedback loop.  “What am I doing and how does it feel?”  “What is this movement supposed to feel like?”  “What are the ideal conditions I need to create to maximize effectiveness?”  I like to call this the Socratic Method of Coaching as it creates an environment where athletes can safely question habits, previously learned motor patterns, and conventional coaching wisdom.  Motor learning is obviously a neurological process that requires a high level of kinestethic feedback, but if an athlete has no contextual lens through which he/she can “see” (re: feel) a movement, the learning process grinds to a halt.  Specific lines of questioning and cueing develop that lens for our athletes. Here’s a conversation I had recently with a collegiate baseball player as we were doing some maximal velocity work:

 

Me: “Do you feel that ‘bounce’ when your foot strikes the ground forcefully under your hip as opposed to in front of your hip?”  

Him: “What do you mean ‘bounce’”?

Me: “How does it feel when you hop on one foot.”

Him: “Ah, I can’t hop if my foot doesn’t hit the ground under my hips.” (as he hops on one foot)

 

These light bulb moments don’t happen nearly as frequently as I’d like with my athletes, but when they do, it’s like turning the effectiveness of the movement up to 11.  

 

One psychological component of Socratic Coaching is to approach questioning and cueing with a completely open mind, not allowing criticism to affect our ability to communicate with our athletes.  Our athletes depend on us for emotional support far more than we realize so any perception of negativity by them in this process will compromise its effectiveness.  Athletes need to feel safe to make mistakes without realizing it because ultimately, we’re leading them to coach themselves.  Non-judgmentalism is a critical piece that allows athletes to get to the point where their own feedback loop corrects their movement.  The intangible aspect of an open-minded approach is that it helps us build an almost unbreakable rapport with our athletes, leading to even more effective coaching.  

 

I’ve been around many sport coaches and performance coaches, who subscribe to the “coach every rep” methodology.  I think this method leads to proverbial paralysis by analysis, and kinesthetically-speaking, it really is like paralysis because the athlete is so overloaded by external verbal feedback that they can’t feel their own movement.  When we ask our athletes to execute highly technical and neurologically demanding movements, the most important component of that process for them is cognition.  As Buddy Morris has said thousands of times, “Awareness creates cognition creates motor learning.”  We develop our athletes' awareness by creating an optimal learning environment free of excess stimuli and negativity, which allows them to freely develop cognitively and kinesthetically, leading eventually to successful execution of motor patterns completing the motor learning process.  

 

I would implore you as coaches to really evaluate your own methodology and processes; ask your athletes how they learn best and how they feel.  Lead them to learn, rather than pushing them to learn. 

Comment

Comment

Coaching the Person Behind the Athlete

"I'm an old school coach." Those five words might make up the most destructive sentence to a young athlete.  

In the profession of coaching, we have seen a philosophical bell curve of sorts.  Around the turn of the 20th century, when sports were firmly implanting themselves as cultural mainstays, coaches were some of the most well-rounded individuals in society; equally adept at a black tie event as they were on the sidelines.  They were masters of trades, renaissance men, and pioneers of their growing sports.  Some of the greatest football coaches in history are names no one seems to know anymore: Amos Alonzo Stagg, Fielding Yost, and Knute Rockne.  The reason these names should hold significance now is not because of their win-loss records, but because of how they coached.  They were teachers, first and foremost, engineers of the game, not glorified cheerleaders or taskmasters.  Their skills as people lent themselves very strongly to their skills as coaches.  Rarely raising their voice or maintaining an authoritarian fist over their athletes, instead they empowered their athletes with autonomy through education.

Fast forward a half-century, and we see the crest of the curve taking shape, with "characters" like Woody Hayes routinely berating his players and manipulating them into submission.  Bobby Knight's chair-throwing antics and intolerance of imperfection were widely known and somewhat bewilderingly, embraced.  During this time period and into the late 1980s, the authoritarian coaching style was predominant and as more coaches found themselves in the media, young coaches naturally emulated their approaches.  The justification being that if you were hard on a young athlete, but made sure to explain yourself after, all would be well.   Despite being so apparently widely-respected, I have never had a lot of respect for this type of approach; it has always seemed to be an excuse for poor behavior and indicative of a lack of self-control, empathy, and cultural maturity.  

As we are now well into the 21st century, there have been advances in the psychology of coaching, and in many ways, some of us have evolved backwards (not devolved).  While there are far too many successful coaches who still negatively coerce their athletes and maintain their authoritarianism, there is a growing number of successful coaches who have embraced the truly "old school" (circa 1920) mentality of teaching and proactively coaching.  Pete Carroll is a fantastic example of this mentality.  Relentlessly, but not disingenuously positive, he exudes every quality he wants his players to exhibit.  Ever the educator, if he raises his voice, it is in enthusiastic support of his players and coaches.  Outside of the hyper-masculine realm of American Football, Dan Pfaff is another incredibly proactive coach.  A world-class track and field coach, Pfaff's approach is so unique and unorthodox, that he is frequently referred to as an enigma.  As the coach of 29 individual national champions and multiple Olympic Medalists, Pfaff is inarguably one of the most successful track coaches in the world, yet his coaching style is very heavy on education and empowerment; reminiscent of what we might imagine Socrates would be like.  

As coaching continues to develop as a profession, I would encourage all coaches to embrace the psychological and philosophical components of coaching.  Develop relationships with your athletes that demonstrate your concern for their well-being at all times, not just when you are off the field.  Develop a proactive approach where you prevent problems from arising through communication and education as opposed to a reactive approach where you impulsively react to a problem irrationally.  Positivity and proactivity are the two most powerful tools we have as coaches and we should use them constantly, not just when it is convenient for us.  When I reflect back on my career, I want to be able to say that I was more like Knute Rockne or John Wooden than Woody Hayes or Bobby Knight.

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 07.27.16

I called this one the Posterior Chain Power Hour...and a half...from hell. 

Movement Prep (10:00)

Hip Flow x5 ea

Mini Band Forward Bear Crawls x20

Mini Band Reverse Bear Crawls x20

Mini Band Lateral Bear Crawls x10 ea

TGUs x3 ea (20kg)

TGUs x3 ea (24kg)

Snatch Ladder (8:00)

Doubles up to 135

Singles from 140 up

Increase in load until 2 consecutive misses or time cut

Hit 175 at time cut

Clean Ladder (8:00)

Doubles up to 205

Singles from 215 up

Increase in load until 2 consecutive misses or time cut

Hit 245 at time cut

Strength Work (20:00)

A. Deadlift

6x315/4x335/2x355

8 Ring Pull-ups

B. Deadlift

6x325/4x345/2x375

8 Ring Dips

Met-Con

3 Rounds for time:

20 Pull-ups

40 KB Swings (24kg)

Lower Body SMR x60s ea

 

 

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 07.25.16

This one was a lot of fun, mixing some barbell work with gymnastics work.  It was tough, for sure, but really enjoyable.

Movement Prep (12:00)

Hip Flow x5 ea

Knee Band Forward Bear Crawl x20

Knee Band Reverse Bear Crawl x20

Wrist Band Lateral Bear Crawl x10 ea

TGUs x3 ea (20kg)

TGUs x3 ea (24kg)

Block 1

10 Minute EMOM Snatch Ladder

Every 2 mins for 6 mins perform (3 sets):

1 Hang Squat Snatch+1 Squat Snatch

Then for the following 4 mins perform (2 sets):

1 Heavy Squat Snatch (85%+)

I ended up hitting a single at 165, my heaviest in almost 9 months so that felt good.

Block 2

Every 3 Minutes for 9 Minutes (3 sets):

A. Back Squat x5 (275,295,315)

B. 10 Ring Dips

Block 3

Every 4 Minutes for 12 Minutes (3 Sets):

A. Bench Press x6@30X1 (185)

B. 3 Legless Rope Climbs 

C. 15s L-Sit on the Rings

Mobility/Recovery

Lower Body SMR x60s each position

Lat SMR x60s ea

T-Spine Ext on Roller x5

 

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 07.22.16

I had 30 minutes to get this one in so I did everything either against a running clock or in EMOM format.  My average heart rate for those 30 minutes was 155 bpm, so yea, it was rough.  

Movement Prep (5:00)

Mini Band Monster Walk 1x20 ea

TGUs: alternating R/L for the remaining time (ended up with 6/6)

Block 1

10 Minute EMOM Snatch Ladder

First 5 Minutes: Hang Snatch+Squat Snatch w/ ascending load (55/57/60/65/70%)

Second 5 Minutes: Squat Snatch w/ ascending load (70/75/80/82/85%)

Plus a bonus double @ 90%

3 Minutes Rest

Block 2

Against a 5 Minute Running Clock:

5 Hang Cleans @135

10 Strict Pull-ups

15 Toes-to-Bar

I ended getting 2 rounds

 

 

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 07.18.16

Movement Prep

Hip Flow 1x5 ea

Mini Band Monster Walk 1x20 ea

Mini Band Fwd/Rev Crawl 1x20 ea

Mini Band Lateral Crawl 1x10 ea

TGUs 1x5 ea (20kg)

Block 1

Every 2 minutes, for 16 minutes (8 sets):

2 Snatches + 1 Overhead Squat

Block 2

Every 2 minutes, for 8 minutes (4 sets)

5 Front Squats

5 SA KB Push Press (24kg)

Met-Con

For Time

18-12-6

Pull-ups

KB Swings (24kg)

Mobility

Lower Body SMR

Adductors

Quads

ITB/TFL

Glutes 

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 07.15.16

Movement Prep

Mini Band Monster Walk 1x20e

Mini Band Lateral Bear Crawl 1x10e

TGUs 1x5e

Strength Block

A. 10 EMOM (Perform set every 75 seconds; 8 sets total)

Hang Squat Snatch/Squat Snatch

(95/115/125/130/135/140/145/150)

Met-Con

12 Minute AMRAP

A. 12 Strict Pull-Ups

B. 9 Toes-to-Bar

C. 6 KB Renegade Rows (24kg)

Mobility

Hip Flow 1x5e

 

Comment

Comment

Valhalla WOD 07.13.16

A little late posting this one, but it was a soul-crusher:

Movement Prep

Monster Walk 2x20e

Goblet Squat 2x10@3211 (24kg)

TGUs 2x5e

Then... Work

A.
Every 90 seconds, for 15 minutes (10 sets):
Hang Clean + Clean

Loads per set (%): 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 80, 85, 85

B.
Every 3 minutes, for 9 minutes (3 sets):

RDL x 8 reps @ 70-75% of 1-RM

C.
“Helen”
Three rounds for time of:

Run 400 Meters

21 Kettlebell Snatches (20kg)

12 Pull-Ups 

Comment

Comment

But, Why?

When I was in 7th grade, my parents put me in an advanced math class at my middle school called Algebra 1/2.  I had never struggled in math prior to that point because it was all fairly straightforward to me, but I struggled with Algebra 1/2 because of the one thing my teacher repeatedly (and irrationally, in my opinion) told us to do: SHOW YOUR WORK.  I would work through the algebraic equations with ease in my head, rarely bothering to put pencil to paper because I just didn't see the point.  I almost always got the right answer, and when I didn't, I could usually find where I went wrong by retracing my steps mentally while also explaining how I got to that point to the chagrin of my teacher.  I think I ended up with a B+ for the year, which is not bad, but it could have very easily been an A+ had my teacher been less rigid.  She was a good enough teacher, but she could never answer that critical question for me, "Why do I need to show my work if I get the right answer?"

This sentiment seems to be common in today's young athletes: the constant need to know why coaches want them to do something.  Much of what I hear from coaches in response to an athlete asking them "why?" is usually along the lines of, "These millennials sure are entitled..."  It's a response that, as a millennial, makes me cringe.  Many coaches see this simple request for rationale as a question of their ultimate authority, when in reality it is the epitome of what gives athletes the power to sustainably develop: autonomy.  As coaches, when we embrace our athletes' inner desire for understanding, we build a deeper emotional connection with them, and thereby enhance every other developmental quality.  

Probably the most overused cliche in coaching, "They don't care how much you know until they know how much you care," is also probably the truest.  When athletes ask us why, we feel that our authority is being challenged, but actually what is being challenged is our own understanding of our methodology, our preparation, and ultimately, our commitment to our athletes.  When we go into a training session or practice unprepared (as I have many times in the past), we do our athletes a disservice by not being fully committed to their success.  Preparation and a thorough understanding of our methodology will lead to better prepared and more sustainably committed athletes.  Embrace the why.

Comment